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Plain Ol' As Model A Ford Club
Plain Ol' As Model A Ford Club
              Serving Northeast Kansas
Introduction
     Let’s face it…Men’s Shoes have pretty much always been boring and there were no large changes in footwear throughout the Model A period.  That’s good for us ‘cause it means we can find shoes today that would fit right in.   Looking through period catalogs, one thing that pops out is that “Shoes” are what we might call ‘high-tops” whereas the shoe shape we’re more familiar were specifically called "Oxfords."  We'll discuss each style of footwear based on the kind of setting in which it would be found.

Formal Business and Dress Occasions
     For business and casual wear, shoes and oxfords used either black or brown leather for the uppers.  However, 1930 saw the introduction of bold, new colors like Navy Blue.  (As an aside, the leather could be anything from kid to kangaroo!)  The leather soles matched the uppers in color and sported a leather heel (with or without a rubber heel cap).  As a generalization for the Model A times, the “Oxford” style seemed to be gaining in popularity over the high-topped shoes, especially in the summer.  In colder weather, the well-dressed gentleman would either don a pair of spats (in gray, light brown, or white) or switch to high-tops for warmth.

    Stitching and other decorations across the toe tended to be subdued (straight stitched rather than “wing-tip” design) and some plain toes with no stitching were infrequently seen.  There was some variation in the toes from the somewhat square and boxy “Blucher” to the more modern rounded version, termed the “Balmoral” toe.  All toes, however, tend to look noticeably more blunt than those in fashion today.

     Shoes for dress occasions could lace all the way up or incorporate hooks above the ankle.
While “step-in” oxfords (what we would call “loafers) were becoming acceptable, dressy versions frequently had some form of decoration that would resemble lacing.

         
1928                          1929                            1930                         1931
Men's Footwear
Designed by GOEMO.de
1928 SR Fall-Win p302 Men Shoes, Dress 1
1928 SR Fall-Win p302 Men Shoes, Dress 2
Footwear for the Blue Collar Working world and Casual Occasions
     The casual shoe and oxford seemed to have a somewhat more pronounced stitching, including “wing tips” and perforations along the stitching and even into the toe.  Two-tone shoes (white and black as well as white and brown) appeared were popular for participation in spring and summer sports (even if just watching) and other outdoor activities.

         
1928                          1929                            1930                         1931

Athletic Shoes
     Canvas shoes in white, black and brown, were available in both low-quarters and high top versions.  (think “Keds”) as well as the still-in-use-today white low-quarters were both very popular.  Athletic shoes could have separate heels or solid platform soles, with the back of the sole being thicker.

         
1928                          1929                            1930                         1931

Modern replacements
     While, you could find shoes with the same rounded toe without stitching in Model A times, where’s the fun in that?  Watch for stubby or blocky toes  with some stitching across the toe.   And, yes, Virginia, you can STILL buy high-top leather shoes! 

1929 CMO Spr-Sum p192 Men Shoe
1929 CMO Spr-Sum p188 Men Shoe
1930 BH Sum p146 Men Dress Shoes 1
1930 BH Sum p146 Men Dress Shoes 2
1930 BH Sum p146 Men Dress Shoes 31
1930 MW Fall-Win  p089 men Dress shoe 1
1931 Sears Fall-Win p0296 Men Dress Shoe 3
1931 Sears Fall-Win p0297 Men Dress  Shoe 3
1931 Sears Fall-Win p0297 Men Casual Shoe 3
1931 BB Nov p424 Men Shoes, casual
1930 BH Sum p146 Men Casual  Shoes 1
1930 MW Fall-Win p088 men Casual shoe 1
1930 Sears Sum p010 Men Athletic 2
1930 Sears Sum p010 M-W-Y Athletic
BH Spr-Sum 1930 p152 Shoes Athletic
Introduction
     Let’s face it…Men’s Shoes have pretty much always been boring and there were no large changes in footwear throughout the Model A period.  That’s good for us ‘cause it means we can find shoes today that would fit right in.   Looking through period catalogs, one thing that pops out is that “Shoes” are what we might call ‘high-tops” whereas the shoe shape we’re more familiar were specifically called "Oxfords."  We'll discuss each style of footwear based on the kind of setting in which it would be found.

  There was some variation in the toes from the somewhat square and boxy “Blucher” to the more modern rounded version, sometimes termed the “Balmoral” toe.  Most of the toe shapes, however, tend to look noticeably more blunt than those in fashion today.
1929 CMO p188 Spr-Sum Men Suit & Shoe 1
1929 CMO p274 Spr-Sum Men Suit & Shoe
1929 CMO p192 Spr-Sum Men Suit & Shoe
1928 SR Fall-Win p304 Men Shoes, Casual 1
1928 SR Fall-Win p304 Men Shoes, Casual 2
1929 CMO Spr-Sum p193 MW Athletic Shoe 2
1929 CMO Spr-Sum p193 MW Athletic Shoe
1928 SR Fall-Win p320 Men Shoes, Athletic
1928 SR Fall-Win p320 Men Shoes, Athletic 2